Gough Whitlam memorial: The music

admin | 杭州桑拿
4 Dec 2018

Australian actress Cate Blanchett speaks at the memorial service for former Australian prime minister Gough Whitlam at Sydney Town Hall. Australian actress Cate Blanchett speaks at the memorial service for former Australian prime minister Gough Whitlam at Sydney Town Hall.
杭州桑拿按摩

Australian actress Cate Blanchett speaks at the memorial service for former Australian prime minister Gough Whitlam at Sydney Town Hall.

Australian actress Cate Blanchett speaks at the memorial service for former Australian prime minister Gough Whitlam at Sydney Town Hall.

Wir setzeuns mit tranen nieder, Final chorus from St Matthew’s Passion 1727 JS Bach

Bach’s Passion recounts the final events leading up to the crucifixion of Jesus. The final chorus, “we sit down in tears”, is sung by the two choirs almost entirely in unison. United in grief the two choirs continue to the end, the final words, “Highly contented, there the eyes fall asleep.”

Va Pensioro, “Chorus of the Hebrew slaves” from Nabucco 1842 Giusseppe Verdi

Va, pensiero, known as Verdi’s “Jewish” work of art, became the theme song of Garibaldi’s followers during the Risorgimento – the uprising to unite Italy. It is understood Gough Whitlam chose the revolutionary song for the expression it gave to the Italian people’s aspirations for liberty and self-government.

From Little Things Big Things Grow 1991  Paul Kelly and Kev Carmody

No song seems more fitting for the former prime minister than Kelly and Carmody’s anthem for Indigenous Australia. It is based on the trials of Vincent Lingiari and the Gurindji strike, culminating in the Aboriginal Land Rights Act, one of Gough Whitlam’s most noble achievements.

Un Bal, Symphonie Fantastique, Op. 14 1830  Hector Berlioz

This immense work tells the story of an artist in despair over a “hopeless love.”  It is credited for creating a sound that is considered entirely Berlioz’s own. Un bal, the second movement, is a waltz in rondo form and it attempts to depict the affections of a young man.

Jerusalem – Hubert Parry 1916

Parry’s choral work put music to William Blake’s 1804 poem “And did those feet in ancient time.” The text was inspired by the apocryphal story of Jesus’ journey to England. When put to the music of Parry it became the progressive anthem for the suffragette movement.

 

Comments are closed.